2019 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code A00

Cholera

    2016 2017 2018 2019 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code
  • A00 should not be used for reimbursement purposes as there are multiple codes below it that contain a greater level of detail.
  • The 2019 edition of ICD-10-CM A00 became effective on October 1, 2018.
  • This is the American ICD-10-CM version of A00 - other international versions of ICD-10 A00 may differ.
The following code(s) above A00 contain annotation back-references
Annotation Back-References
In this context, annotation back-references refer to codes that contain:
  • Applicable To annotations, or
  • Code Also annotations, or
  • Code First annotations, or
  • Excludes1 annotations, or
  • Excludes2 annotations, or
  • Includes annotations, or
  • Note annotations, or
  • Use Additional annotations
that may be applicable to A00:
  • A00-B99
    2019 ICD-10-CM Range A00-B99

    Certain infectious and parasitic diseases

    Includes
    • diseases generally recognized as communicable or transmissible
    Type 1 Excludes
    • certain localized infections - see body system-related chapters
    Type 2 Excludes
    • carrier or suspected carrier of infectious disease (Z22.-)
    • infectious and parasitic diseases complicating pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (O98.-)
    • infectious and parasitic diseases specific to the perinatal period (P35-P39)
    • influenza and other acute respiratory infections (J00-J22)
    Use Additional
    • code to identify resistance to antimicrobial drugs (Z16.-)
    Certain infectious and parasitic diseases
Clinical Information
  • Acute diarrheal disease endemic in India and southeast Asia whose causative agent is vibrio cholerae; can lead to severe dehydration in a matter of hours unless quickly treated.
  • An acute diarrheal disease endemic in India and southeast Asia whose causative agent is vibrio cholerae. This condition can lead to severe dehydration in a matter of hours unless quickly treated.
  • Cholera is a bacterial infection that causes diarrhea. The cholera bacterium is usually found in water or food contaminated by feces . Cholera is rare in the United States. You may get it if you travel to parts of the world with inadequate water treatment and poor sanitation, and lack of sewage treatment. Outbreaks can also happen after disasters. The disease is not likely to spread directly from one person to another. Often the infection is mild or without symptoms, but sometimes it can be severe. Severe symptoms include profuse watery diarrhea, vomiting, and leg cramps. In severe cases, rapid loss of body fluids leads to dehydration and shock. Without treatment, death can occur within hours. Doctors diagnose cholera with a stool sample or rectal swab. Treatment includes replacing fluid and salts and sometimes antibiotics. Anyone who thinks they may have cholera should seek medical attention immediately. Dehydration can be rapid so fluid replacement is essential. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Code History
  • 2016 (effective 10/1/2015): New code (first year of non-draft ICD-10-CM)
  • 2017 (effective 10/1/2016): No change
  • 2018 (effective 10/1/2017): No change
  • 2019 (effective 10/1/2018): No change
ICD-10-CM Codes Adjacent To A00
A00 Cholera
A00.0 Cholera due to Vibrio cholerae 01, biovar cholerae
A00.1 Cholera due to Vibrio cholerae 01, biovar eltor
A00.9 Cholera, unspecified
A01 Typhoid and paratyphoid fevers
A01.0 Typhoid fever
A01.00 …… unspecified
A01.01 Typhoid meningitis
A01.02 …… with heart involvement
A01.03 Typhoid pneumonia
A01.04 Typhoid arthritis

Reimbursement claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015 require the use of ICD-10-CM codes.