2022 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code A37.9

Whooping cough, unspecified species

    2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code
  • A37.9 should not be used for reimbursement purposes as there are multiple codes below it that contain a greater level of detail.
  • The 2022 edition of ICD-10-CM A37.9 became effective on October 1, 2021.
  • This is the American ICD-10-CM version of A37.9 - other international versions of ICD-10 A37.9 may differ.
The following code(s) above A37.9 contain annotation back-references
Annotation Back-References
In this context, annotation back-references refer to codes that contain:
  • Applicable To annotations, or
  • Code Also annotations, or
  • Code First annotations, or
  • Excludes1 annotations, or
  • Excludes2 annotations, or
  • Includes annotations, or
  • Note annotations, or
  • Use Additional annotations
that may be applicable to A37.9:
  • A00-B99
    2022 ICD-10-CM Range A00-B99

    Certain infectious and parasitic diseases

    Includes
    • diseases generally recognized as communicable or transmissible
    Type 1 Excludes
    • certain localized infections - see body system-related chapters
    Type 2 Excludes
    • carrier or suspected carrier of infectious disease (Z22.-)
    • infectious and parasitic diseases complicating pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (O98.-)
    • infectious and parasitic diseases specific to the perinatal period (P35-P39)
    • influenza and other acute respiratory infections (J00-J22)
    Use Additional
    • code to identify resistance to antimicrobial drugs (Z16.-)
    Certain infectious and parasitic diseases
Clinical Information
  • Whooping cough is an infectious bacterial disease that causes uncontrollable coughing. The name comes from the noise you make when you take a breath after you cough. You may have choking spells or may cough so hard that you vomit. Anyone can get whooping cough, but it is more common in infants and children. It's especially dangerous for infants. The coughing spells can be so bad that it is hard for infants to eat, drink, or breathe. To make a diagnosis, your doctor may do a physical exam, blood tests, chest x-rays, or nose or throat cultures.before there was a vaccine, whooping cough was one of the most common childhood diseases and a major cause of childhood deaths in the United States Now most cases are prevented by vaccines. If you have whooping cough, treatment with antibiotics may help if given early. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Code History
  • 2016 (effective 10/1/2015): New code (first year of non-draft ICD-10-CM)
  • 2017 (effective 10/1/2016): No change
  • 2018 (effective 10/1/2017): No change
  • 2019 (effective 10/1/2018): No change
  • 2020 (effective 10/1/2019): No change
  • 2021 (effective 10/1/2020): No change
  • 2022 (effective 10/1/2021): No change
ICD-10-CM Codes Adjacent To A37.9
A37 Whooping cough
A37.0 Whooping cough due to Bordetella pertussis
A37.00 …… without pneumonia
A37.01 …… with pneumonia
A37.1 Whooping cough due to Bordetella parapertussis
A37.10 …… without pneumonia
A37.11 …… with pneumonia
A37.8 Whooping cough due to other Bordetella species
A37.80 …… without pneumonia
A37.81 …… with pneumonia
A37.9 Whooping cough, unspecified species
A37.90 …… without pneumonia
A37.91 …… with pneumonia
A38 Scarlet fever
A38.0 Scarlet fever with otitis media
A38.1 Scarlet fever with myocarditis
A38.8 Scarlet fever with other complications
A38.9 Scarlet fever, uncomplicated
A39 Meningococcal infection
A39.0 Meningococcal meningitis
A39.1 Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome

Reimbursement claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015 require the use of ICD-10-CM codes.