2020 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code B01

Varicella [chickenpox]

    2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code
  • B01 should not be used for reimbursement purposes as there are multiple codes below it that contain a greater level of detail.
  • The 2020 edition of ICD-10-CM B01 became effective on October 1, 2019.
  • This is the American ICD-10-CM version of B01 - other international versions of ICD-10 B01 may differ.
The following code(s) above B01 contain annotation back-references
Annotation Back-References
In this context, annotation back-references refer to codes that contain:
  • Applicable To annotations, or
  • Code Also annotations, or
  • Code First annotations, or
  • Excludes1 annotations, or
  • Excludes2 annotations, or
  • Includes annotations, or
  • Note annotations, or
  • Use Additional annotations
that may be applicable to B01:
  • A00-B99
    2020 ICD-10-CM Range A00-B99

    Certain infectious and parasitic diseases

    Includes
    • diseases generally recognized as communicable or transmissible
    Type 1 Excludes
    • certain localized infections - see body system-related chapters
    Type 2 Excludes
    • carrier or suspected carrier of infectious disease (Z22.-)
    • infectious and parasitic diseases complicating pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (O98.-)
    • infectious and parasitic diseases specific to the perinatal period (P35-P39)
    • influenza and other acute respiratory infections (J00-J22)
    Use Additional
    • code to identify resistance to antimicrobial drugs (Z16.-)
    Certain infectious and parasitic diseases
Clinical Information
  • A contagious childhood disorder caused by the varicella zoster virus. It is transmitted via respiratory secretions and contact with chickenpox blister contents. It presents with a vesicular skin rush, usually associated with fever, headache, and myalgias. The pruritic fluid-filled vesicles occur 10-21 days after exposure and last for 3-4 days. An additional 3-4 days of malaise follows before the affected individual feels better. An individual is contagious 1-2 days prior to the appearance of the blisters until all blisters are crusted over. Generally, healthy individuals recover without complications.
  • A highly contagious infectious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (herpesvirus 3, human). It usually affects children, is spread by direct contact or respiratory route via droplet nuclei, and is characterized by the appearance on the skin and mucous membranes of successive crops of typical pruritic vesicular lesions that are easily broken and become scabbed. Chickenpox is relatively benign in children, but may be complicated by pneumonia and encephalitis in adults. (from Dorland, 27th ed)
  • Chickenpox is an infectious disease caused by the varicella virus. Most cases occur in children under age 15 but older children and adults can get it. It spreads very easily from one child to another.symptoms include an uncomfortable, itchy rash, fever and headache. The rash is like blisters and usually appears on the face, scalp or trunk. The disease is usually mild and lasts 5 to 10 days, but it sometimes causes serious problems. Adults and older children tend to get sicker from it. Do not give aspirin to anyone sick with chickenpox since the combination might cause reye syndrome. Once you catch chickenpox, the virus usually stays in your body forever. You probably will not get chickenpox again, but the virus can cause shingles in adults. A chickenpox vaccine can help prevent most cases of chickenpox, or make it less severe if you do get it. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Highly contagious infectious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (herpesvirus 3); usually affects children, is spread by direct contact or respiratory route via droplet nuclei, and is characterized by the appearance on the skin and mucous membranes of successive crops of typical pruritic vesicular lesions that are easily broken and become scabbed; chickenpox is relatively benign in children, but may be complicated by pneumonia and encephalitis in adults.
Code History
  • 2016 (effective 10/1/2015): New code (first year of non-draft ICD-10-CM)
  • 2017 (effective 10/1/2016): No change
  • 2018 (effective 10/1/2017): No change
  • 2019 (effective 10/1/2018): No change
  • 2020 (effective 10/1/2019): No change
Code annotations containing back-references to B01:
  • Type 2 Excludes: B10
    , B10
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code B10

    Other human herpesviruses

      2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code
    Type 2 Excludes
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code B10

    Other human herpesviruses

      2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code
    Type 2 Excludes
ICD-10-CM Codes Adjacent To B01
B00.51 Herpesviral iridocyclitis
B00.52 Herpesviral keratitis
B00.53 Herpesviral conjunctivitis
B00.59 Other herpesviral disease of eye
B00.7 Disseminated herpesviral disease
B00.8 Other forms of herpesviral infections
B00.81 Herpesviral hepatitis
B00.82 Herpes simplex myelitis
B00.89 Other herpesviral infection
B00.9 Herpesviral infection, unspecified
B01 Varicella [chickenpox]
B01.0 Varicella meningitis
B01.1 Varicella encephalitis, myelitis and encephalomyelitis
B01.11 Varicella encephalitis and encephalomyelitis
B01.12 Varicella myelitis
B01.2 Varicella pneumonia
B01.8 Varicella with other complications
B01.81 Varicella keratitis
B01.89 Other varicella complications
B01.9 Varicella without complication
B02 Zoster [herpes zoster]

Reimbursement claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015 require the use of ICD-10-CM codes.