2020 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code C80

Malignant neoplasm without specification of site

    2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code
  • C80 should not be used for reimbursement purposes as there are multiple codes below it that contain a greater level of detail.
  • The 2020 edition of ICD-10-CM C80 became effective on October 1, 2019.
  • This is the American ICD-10-CM version of C80 - other international versions of ICD-10 C80 may differ.
Type 1 Excludes
Type 1 Excludes Help
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes. It means "not coded here". A type 1 excludes note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as C80. A type 1 excludes note is for used for when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • malignant carcinoid tumor of unspecified site (
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code C7A.00

    Malignant carcinoid tumor of unspecified site

      2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Billable/Specific Code
    C7A.00
    )
  • malignant neoplasm of specified multiple sites- code to each site
The following code(s) above C80 contain annotation back-references
Annotation Back-References
In this context, annotation back-references refer to codes that contain:
  • Applicable To annotations, or
  • Code Also annotations, or
  • Code First annotations, or
  • Excludes1 annotations, or
  • Excludes2 annotations, or
  • Includes annotations, or
  • Note annotations, or
  • Use Additional annotations
that may be applicable to C80:
  • C00-D49
    2020 ICD-10-CM Range C00-D49

    Neoplasms

    Note
    • Functional activity
    • All neoplasms are classified in this chapter, whether they are functionally active or not. An additional code from Chapter 4 may be used, to identify functional activity associated with any neoplasm.
    • Morphology [Histology]
    • Chapter 2 classifies neoplasms primarily by site (topography), with broad groupings for behavior, malignant, in situ, benign, etc. The Table of Neoplasms should be used to identify the correct topography code. In a few cases, such as for malignant melanoma and certain neuroendocrine tumors, the morphology (histologic type) is included in the category and codes.
    • Primary malignant neoplasms overlapping site boundaries
    • A primary malignant neoplasm that overlaps two or more contiguous (next to each other) sites should be classified to the subcategory/code .8 ('overlapping lesion'), unless the combination is specifically indexed elsewhere. For multiple neoplasms of the same site that are not contiguous, such as tumors in different quadrants of the same breast, codes for each site should be assigned.
    • Malignant neoplasm of ectopic tissue
    • Malignant neoplasms of ectopic tissue are to be coded to the site mentioned, e.g., ectopic pancreatic malignant neoplasms are coded to pancreas, unspecified (C25.9).
    Neoplasms
Clinical Information
  • A general term for autonomous tissue growth exhibiting morphologic features of malignancy (e.g. Severe atypia, nuclear pleomorphism, tumor cell necrosis, abnormal mitoses, tissue invasiveness) and for which the transformed cell type has not been specifically identified.
  • A term for diseases in which abnormal cells divide without control and can invade nearby tissues. Malignant cells can also spread to other parts of the body through the blood and lymph systems. There are several main types of malignancy. Carcinoma is a malignancy that begins in the skin or in tissues that line or cover internal organs. Sarcoma is a malignancy that begins in bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, blood vessels, or other connective or supportive tissue. Leukemia is a malignancy that starts in blood-forming tissue such as the bone marrow, and causes large numbers of abnormal blood cells to be produced and enter the blood. Lymphoma and multiple myeloma are malignancies that begin in the cells of the immune system. Central nervous system cancers are malignancies that begin in the tissues of the brain and spinal cord.
  • A term for diseases in which abnormal cells divide without control. Cancer cells can invade nearby tissues and can spread through the bloodstream and lymphatic system to other parts of the body.
  • A tumor composed of atypical neoplastic, often pleomorphic cells that invade other tissues. Malignant neoplasms often metastasize to distant anatomic sites and may recur after excision. The most common malignant neoplasms are carcinomas (adenocarcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas), hodgkin and non-hodgkin lymphomas, leukemias, melanomas, and sarcomas.
  • Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body. Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. nih: national cancer institute
  • New abnormal tissue that grows by excessive cellular division and proliferation more rapidly than normal and continues to grow after the stimuli that initiated the new growth cease; tumors perform no useful body function and may be benign or malignant; benign neoplasms are a noncancerous growth that does not invade nearby tissue or spread to other parts of the body; malignant neoplasms or cancer show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis; neoplasm terms herein do not distinguish between benign or malignant states, use references listed to cover this concept.
Code History
  • 2016 (effective 10/1/2015): New code (first year of non-draft ICD-10-CM)
  • 2017 (effective 10/1/2016): No change
  • 2018 (effective 10/1/2017): No change
  • 2019 (effective 10/1/2018): No change
  • 2020 (effective 10/1/2019): No change
ICD-10-CM Codes Adjacent To C80
C79.62 Secondary malignant neoplasm of left ovary
C79.7 Secondary malignant neoplasm of adrenal gland
C79.70 Secondary malignant neoplasm of unspecified adrenal gland
C79.71 Secondary malignant neoplasm of right adrenal gland
C79.72 Secondary malignant neoplasm of left adrenal gland
C79.8 Secondary malignant neoplasm of other specified sites
C79.81 Secondary malignant neoplasm of breast
C79.82 Secondary malignant neoplasm of genital organs
C79.89 Secondary malignant neoplasm of other specified sites
C79.9 Secondary malignant neoplasm of unspecified site
C80 Malignant neoplasm without specification of site
C80.0 Disseminated malignant neoplasm, unspecified
C80.1 Malignant (primary) neoplasm, unspecified
C80.2 Malignant neoplasm associated with transplanted organ
C81 Hodgkin lymphoma
C81.0 Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma
C81.00 …… unspecified site
C81.01 …… lymph nodes of head, face, and neck
C81.02 …… intrathoracic lymph nodes
C81.03 …… intra-abdominal lymph nodes
C81.04 …… lymph nodes of axilla and upper limb

Reimbursement claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015 require the use of ICD-10-CM codes.