2020 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code F43.10

Post-traumatic stress disorder, unspecified

    2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Billable/Specific Code
  • F43.10 is a billable/specific ICD-10-CM code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis for reimbursement purposes.
  • The 2020 edition of ICD-10-CM F43.10 became effective on October 1, 2019.
  • This is the American ICD-10-CM version of F43.10 - other international versions of ICD-10 F43.10 may differ.
The following code(s) above F43.10 contain annotation back-references
Annotation Back-References
In this context, annotation back-references refer to codes that contain:
  • Applicable To annotations, or
  • Code Also annotations, or
  • Code First annotations, or
  • Excludes1 annotations, or
  • Excludes2 annotations, or
  • Includes annotations, or
  • Note annotations, or
  • Use Additional annotations
that may be applicable to F43.10:
  • F01-F99
    2020 ICD-10-CM Range F01-F99

    Mental, Behavioral and Neurodevelopmental disorders

    Includes
    • disorders of psychological development
    Type 2 Excludes
    • symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00-R99)
    Mental, Behavioral and Neurodevelopmental disorders
  • F43.1
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code F43.1

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

      2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code
    Applicable To
    • Traumatic neurosis
    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
Approximate Synonyms
  • Concentration camp syndrome
  • Dissociative symptoms co-occurrent and due to posttraumatic stress disorder
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder w delayed expression
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder w dissociative symptoms
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder, delayed onset
Clinical Information
  • A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.
  • Acute, chronic, or delayed reactions to traumatic events such as military combat, assault, or natural disaster.
  • An anxiety disorder precipitated by an experience of intense fear or horror while exposed to a traumatic (especially life-threatening) event. The disorder is characterized by intrusive recurring thoughts or images of the traumatic event; avoidance of anything associated with the event; a state of hyperarousal and diminished emotional responsiveness. These symptoms are present for at least one month and the disorder is usually long-term.
  • An anxiety disorder that develops in reaction to physical injury or severe mental or emotional distress, such as military combat, violent assault, natural disaster, or other life-threatening events. Having cancer may also lead to post-traumatic stress disorder. Symptoms interfere with day-to-day living and include reliving the event in nightmares or flashbacks; avoiding people, places, and things connected to the event; feeling alone and losing interest in daily activities; and having trouble concentrating and sleeping.
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a real illness. You can get PTSD after living through or seeing a traumatic event, such as war, a hurricane, rape, physical abuse or a bad accident. Ptsd makes you feel stressed and afraid after the danger is over. It affects your life and the people around you. Ptsd can cause problems like
    • flashbacks, or feeling like the event is happening again
    • trouble sleeping or nightmares
    • feeling alone
    • angry outbursts
    • feeling worried, guilty or sad
    PTSD starts at different times for different people. Signs of PTSD may start soon after a frightening event and then continue. Other people develop new or more severe signs months or even years later. Ptsd can happen to anyone, even children. Medicines can help you feel less afraid and tense. It might take a few weeks for them to work. Talking to a specially trained doctor or counselor also helps many people with PTSD. This is called talk therapy.
ICD-10-CM F43.10 is grouped within Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v37.0):
  • 882 Neuroses except depressive

Convert F43.10 to ICD-9-CM

Code History
  • 2016 (effective 10/1/2015): New code (first year of non-draft ICD-10-CM)
  • 2017 (effective 10/1/2016): No change
  • 2018 (effective 10/1/2017): No change
  • 2019 (effective 10/1/2018): No change
  • 2020 (effective 10/1/2019): No change

Diagnosis Index entries containing back-references to F43.10:

ICD-10-CM Codes Adjacent To F43.10
F41.9 Anxiety disorder, unspecified
F42 Obsessive-compulsive disorder
F42.2 Mixed obsessional thoughts and acts
F42.3 Hoarding disorder
F42.4 Excoriation (skin-picking) disorder
F42.8 Other obsessive-compulsive disorder
F42.9 Obsessive-compulsive disorder, unspecified
F43 Reaction to severe stress, and adjustment disorders
F43.0 Acute stress reaction
F43.1 Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
F43.10 Post-traumatic stress disorder, unspecified
F43.11 Post-traumatic stress disorder, acute
F43.12 Post-traumatic stress disorder, chronic
F43.2 Adjustment disorders
F43.20 Adjustment disorder, unspecified
F43.21 Adjustment disorder with depressed mood
F43.22 Adjustment disorder with anxiety
F43.23 Adjustment disorder with mixed anxiety and depressed mood
F43.24 Adjustment disorder with disturbance of conduct
F43.25 Adjustment disorder with mixed disturbance of emotions and conduct
F43.29 Adjustment disorder with other symptoms

Reimbursement claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015 require the use of ICD-10-CM codes.