2020 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code G40.9

Epilepsy, unspecified

    2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code
  • G40.9 should not be used for reimbursement purposes as there are multiple codes below it that contain a greater level of detail.
  • The 2020 edition of ICD-10-CM G40.9 became effective on October 1, 2019.
  • This is the American ICD-10-CM version of G40.9 - other international versions of ICD-10 G40.9 may differ.
The following code(s) above G40.9 contain annotation back-references
Annotation Back-References
In this context, annotation back-references refer to codes that contain:
  • Applicable To annotations, or
  • Code Also annotations, or
  • Code First annotations, or
  • Excludes1 annotations, or
  • Excludes2 annotations, or
  • Includes annotations, or
  • Note annotations, or
  • Use Additional annotations
that may be applicable to G40.9:
  • G00-G99
    2020 ICD-10-CM Range G00-G99

    Diseases of the nervous system

    Type 2 Excludes
    • certain conditions originating in the perinatal period (P04-P96)
    • certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00-B99)
    • complications of pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (O00-O9A)
    • congenital malformations, deformations, and chromosomal abnormalities (Q00-Q99)
    • endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00-E88)
    • injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00-T88)
    • neoplasms (C00-D49)
    • symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00-R94)
    Diseases of the nervous system
  • G40
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code G40

    Epilepsy and recurrent seizures

      2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code
    Note
    • the following terms are to be considered equivalent to intractable: pharmacoresistant (pharmacologically resistant), treatment resistant, refractory (medically) and poorly controlled
    Type 1 Excludes
    • conversion disorder with seizures (F44.5)
    • convulsions NOS (R56.9)
    • post traumatic seizures (R56.1)
    • seizure (convulsive) NOS (R56.9)
    • seizure of newborn (P90)
    Type 2 Excludes
    Epilepsy and recurrent seizures
Clinical Information
  • A brain disorder characterized by episodes of abnormally increased neuronal discharge resulting in transient episodes of sensory or motor neurological dysfunction, or psychic dysfunction. These episodes may or may not be associated with loss of consciousness or convulsions.
  • A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (from Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)
  • A disorder characterized by recurrent seizures
  • A group of disorders marked by problems in the normal functioning of the brain. These problems can produce seizures, unusual body movements, a loss of consciousness or changes in consciousness, as well as mental problems or problems with the senses.
  • Brain disorder characterized by recurring excessive neuronal discharge, exhibited by transient episodes of motor, sensory, or psychic dysfunction, with or without unconsciousness or convulsive movements.
  • Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes people to have recurring seizures. The seizures happen when clusters of nerve cells, or neurons, in the brain send out the wrong signals. People may have strange sensations and emotions or behave strangely. They may have violent muscle spasms or lose consciousness. Epilepsy has many possible causes, including illness, brain injury and abnormal brain development. In many cases, the cause is unknown.doctors use brain scans and other tests to diagnose epilepsy. It is important to start treatment right away. There is no cure for epilepsy, but medicines can control seizures for most people. When medicines are not working well, surgery or implanted devices such as vagus nerve stimulators may help. Special diets can help some children with epilepsy.
Code History
  • 2016 (effective 10/1/2015): New code (first year of non-draft ICD-10-CM)
  • 2017 (effective 10/1/2016): No change
  • 2018 (effective 10/1/2017): No change
  • 2019 (effective 10/1/2018): No change
  • 2020 (effective 10/1/2019): No change
ICD-10-CM Codes Adjacent To G40.9
G40.811 …… not intractable, with status epilepticus
G40.812 …… not intractable, without status epilepticus
G40.813 …… intractable, with status epilepticus
G40.814 …… intractable, without status epilepticus
G40.82 Epileptic spasms
G40.821 …… not intractable, with status epilepticus
G40.822 …… not intractable, without status epilepticus
G40.823 …… intractable, with status epilepticus
G40.824 …… intractable, without status epilepticus
G40.89 Other seizures
G40.9 Epilepsy, unspecified
G40.90 Epilepsy, unspecified, not intractable
G40.901 …… with status epilepticus
G40.909 …… without status epilepticus
G40.91 Epilepsy, unspecified, intractable
G40.911 …… with status epilepticus
G40.919 …… without status epilepticus
G43 Migraine
G43.0 Migraine without aura
G43.00 Migraine without aura, not intractable
G43.001 …… with status migrainosus

Reimbursement claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015 require the use of ICD-10-CM codes.