Optic neuritis H46-

Type 2 Excludes
Type 2 Excludes Help
A type 2 excludes note represents "not included here". A type 2 excludes note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition it is excluded from but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When a type 2 excludes note appears under a code it is acceptable to use both the code (H46) and the excluded code together.
  • ischemic optic neuropathy (
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code H47.01

    Ischemic optic neuropathy

      2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code
    H47.01-
    )
  • neuromyelitis optica [Devic] (
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code G36.0

    Neuromyelitis optica [Devic]

      2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Billable/Specific Code
    Applicable To
    • Demyelination in optic neuritis
    Type 1 Excludes
    • optic neuritis NOS (H46)
    G36.0
    )
Clinical Information
  • A disorder characterized by inflammation of the optic nerve. Causes include autoimmune disorders, infections, toxins, drugs, and multiple sclerosis. It may manifest with acute loss of vision and pain.
  • Inflammation of the optic nerve. Commonly associated conditions include autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis, infections, and granulomatous diseases. Clinical features include retro-orbital pain that is aggravated by eye movement, loss of color vision, and contrast sensitivity that may progress to severe visual loss, an afferent pupillary defect (marcus-gunn pupil), and in some instances optic disc hyperemia and swelling. Inflammation may occur in the portion of the nerve within the globe (neuropapillitis or anterior optic neuritis) or the portion behind the globe (retrobulbar neuritis or posterior optic neuritis).
  • Inflammation of the second cranial nerve or optic nerve; commonly associated conditions include autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis, infections, and granulomatous diseases.
  • What: optic neuritis. Optic neuritis: the inflammation, degeneration, or demyelination of the optic nerve. Why: optic neuritis may be present in patients with sarcoidosis or reiter's syndrome (rarely). How: clinically, patients with optic neuritis present with sudden loss of central vision and pain on moving the eye. Opthalmoscopically there may be hyperemia of the optic disc and distention of the large retinal veins. At later stages the disk margins are blurred and may be slightly elevated simulating papilledema. Refs: vaugn, d and asbury, t: general ophthamology, 8th edition, 1977.
Codes