2020 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code L29

Pruritus

    2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code
  • L29 should not be used for reimbursement purposes as there are multiple codes below it that contain a greater level of detail.
  • The 2020 edition of ICD-10-CM L29 became effective on October 1, 2019.
  • This is the American ICD-10-CM version of L29 - other international versions of ICD-10 L29 may differ.
Type 1 Excludes
Type 1 Excludes Help
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes. It means "not coded here". A type 1 excludes note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as L29. A type 1 excludes note is for used for when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • neurotic excoriation (
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code L98.1

    Factitial dermatitis

      2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Billable/Specific Code
    Applicable To
    • Neurotic excoriation
    Type 1 Excludes
    • Excoriation (skin-picking) disorder (F42.4)
    L98.1
    )
  • psychogenic pruritus (
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code F45.8

    Other somatoform disorders

      2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Billable/Specific Code
    Applicable To
    • Psychogenic dysmenorrhea
    • Psychogenic dysphagia, including 'globus hystericus'
    • Psychogenic pruritus
    • Psychogenic torticollis
    • Somatoform autonomic dysfunction
    • Teeth grinding
    Type 1 Excludes
    • sleep related teeth grinding (G47.63)
    F45.8
    )
The following code(s) above L29 contain annotation back-references
Annotation Back-References
In this context, annotation back-references refer to codes that contain:
  • Applicable To annotations, or
  • Code Also annotations, or
  • Code First annotations, or
  • Excludes1 annotations, or
  • Excludes2 annotations, or
  • Includes annotations, or
  • Note annotations, or
  • Use Additional annotations
that may be applicable to L29:
  • L00-L99
    2020 ICD-10-CM Range L00-L99

    Diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue

    Type 2 Excludes
    • certain conditions originating in the perinatal period (P04-P96)
    • certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00-B99)
    • complications of pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (O00-O9A)
    • congenital malformations, deformations, and chromosomal abnormalities (Q00-Q99)
    • endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00-E88)
    • lipomelanotic reticulosis (I89.8)
    • neoplasms (C00-D49)
    • symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00-R94)
    • systemic connective tissue disorders (M30-M36)
    • viral warts (B07.-)
    Diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue
  • L20-L30
    2020 ICD-10-CM Range L20-L30

    Dermatitis and eczema

    Note
    • In this block the terms dermatitis and eczema are used synonymously and interchangeably.
    Type 2 Excludes
    • chronic (childhood) granulomatous disease (D71)
    • dermatitis gangrenosa (L08.0)
    • dermatitis herpetiformis (L13.0)
    • dry skin dermatitis (L85.3)
    • factitial dermatitis (L98.1)
    • perioral dermatitis (L71.0)
    • radiation-related disorders of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (L55-L59)
    • stasis dermatitis (I87.2)
    Dermatitis and eczema
Clinical Information
  • A disorder characterized by an intense itching sensation.
  • An intense itching sensation that produces the urge to rub or scratch the skin to obtain relief.
  • An intense itching sensation.
  • Intense itching sensation that produces the urge to rub or scratch the skin to obtain relief.
  • Itching is skin tingling or irritation that makes you want to scratch the itchy area. It's a symptom of many health conditions. Common causes are
    • allergic reactions
    • eczema
    • dry skin
    • insect bites and stings
    • irritating chemicals
    • parasites such as pinworms, scabies, head and body lice
    • pregnancy
    • rashes
    • reactions to medicines
    to soothe itchy skin, you can try cold compresses, lotions and lukewarm baths. Avoid scratching, wearing irritating fabrics and high heat and humidity. Most itching is not serious. However, if you itch all over, have hives that keep coming back or have itching without an apparent cause, you might require medical attention.
  • Itching. Severe itching may be a side effect of some cancer treatments and a symptom of some types of cancers.
Code History
  • 2016 (effective 10/1/2015): New code (first year of non-draft ICD-10-CM)
  • 2017 (effective 10/1/2016): No change
  • 2018 (effective 10/1/2017): No change
  • 2019 (effective 10/1/2018): No change
  • 2020 (effective 10/1/2019): No change
ICD-10-CM Codes Adjacent To L29
L27 Dermatitis due to substances taken internally
L27.0 Generalized skin eruption due to drugs and medicaments taken internally
L27.1 Localized skin eruption due to drugs and medicaments taken internally
L27.2 Dermatitis due to ingested food
L27.8 Dermatitis due to other substances taken internally
L27.9 Dermatitis due to unspecified substance taken internally
L28 Lichen simplex chronicus and prurigo
L28.0 Lichen simplex chronicus
L28.1 Prurigo nodularis
L28.2 Other prurigo
L29 Pruritus
L29.0 Pruritus ani
L29.1 Pruritus scroti
L29.2 Pruritus vulvae
L29.3 Anogenital pruritus, unspecified
L29.8 Other pruritus
L29.9 Pruritus, unspecified
L30 Other and unspecified dermatitis
L30.0 Nummular dermatitis
L30.1 Dyshidrosis [pompholyx]
L30.2 Cutaneous autosensitization

Reimbursement claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015 require the use of ICD-10-CM codes.