Vitiligo L80- >

Type 2 Excludes
Type 2 Excludes Help
A type 2 excludes note represents "not included here". A type 2 excludes note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition it is excluded from but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When a type 2 excludes note appears under a code it is acceptable to use both the code (L80) and the excluded code together.
  • vitiligo of eyelids (
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code H02.73

    Vitiligo of eyelid and periocular area

      2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code
    Applicable To
    • Hypopigmentation of eyelid
    H02.73-
    )
  • vitiligo of vulva (
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code N90.89

    Other specified noninflammatory disorders of vulva and perineum

      2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Billable/Specific Code
    Applicable To
    • Adhesions of vulva
    • Hypertrophy of clitoris
    N90.89
    )
Clinical Information
  • A condition in which the skin turns white due to the loss of melanocytes
  • A disorder consisting of areas of macular depigmentation, commonly on extensor aspects of extremities, on the face or neck, and in skin folds. Age of onset is often in young adulthood and the condition tends to progress gradually with lesions enlarging and extending until a quiescent state is reached.
  • Usually progressive, chronic pigmentary anomaly of the skin manifested by depigmented white patches that may be surrounded by a hyperpigmented border.
  • Vitiligo causes white patches on your skin. It can also affect your eyes, mouth and nose. It occurs when the cells that give your skin its color are destroyed. No one knows what destroys them. It is more common in people with autoimmune diseases, and it might run in families. It usually starts before age 40. The white patches are more common where your skin is exposed to the sun. In some cases, the patches spread. Vitiligo can cause your hair to gray early. If you have dark skin, you may lose color inside your mouth. Using sunscreen will help protect your skin, and cosmetics can cover up the patches. Treatments for vitiligo include medicines, light therapy and surgery. Not every treatment is right for everyone. Many have side effects. Some take a long time. Some do not always work. nih: national institute of arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases
Codes