Unspecified kidney failure N19-

Applicable To
  • Uremia NOS
Type 1 Excludes
Type 1 Excludes Help
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes. It means "not coded here". A type 1 excludes note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as N19. A type 1 excludes note is for used for when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • acute kidney failure (
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code N17
    • N17 Acute kidney failure
      • N17.0 Acute kidney failure with tubular necrosis
      • N17.1 Acute kidney failure with acute cortical necr...
      • N17.2 Acute kidney failure with medullary necrosis
      • N17.8 Other acute kidney failure
      • N17.9 Acute kidney failure, unspecified
    N17.-
    )
  • chronic kidney disease (
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code N18
    • N18 Chronic kidney disease (CKD)
      • N18.1 Chronic kidney disease, stage 1
      • N18.2 Chronic kidney disease, stage 2 (mild)
      • N18.3 Chronic kidney disease, stage 3 (moderate)
        • N18.30 Chronic kidney disease, stage 3 unspecified
        • N18.31 Chronic kidney disease, stage 3a
        • N18.32 Chronic kidney disease, stage 3b
      • N18.4 Chronic kidney disease, stage 4 (severe)
      • N18.5 Chronic kidney disease, stage 5
      • N18.6 End stage renal disease
      • N18.9 Chronic kidney disease, unspecified
    N18.-
    )
  • chronic uremia (
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code N18.9

    Chronic kidney disease, unspecified

      2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Billable/Specific Code
    Applicable To
    • Chronic renal disease
    • Chronic renal failure NOS
    • Chronic renal insufficiency
    • Chronic uremia NOS
    • Diffuse sclerosing glomerulonephritis NOS
    N18.9
    )
  • extrarenal uremia (
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code R39.2

    Extrarenal uremia

      2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Billable/Specific Code
    Applicable To
    • Prerenal uremia
    Type 1 Excludes
    • uremia NOS (N19)
    R39.2
    )
  • prerenal uremia (
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code R39.2

    Extrarenal uremia

      2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Billable/Specific Code
    Applicable To
    • Prerenal uremia
    Type 1 Excludes
    • uremia NOS (N19)
    R39.2
    )
  • renal insufficiency (acute) (
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code N28.9

    Disorder of kidney and ureter, unspecified

      2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Billable/Specific Code
    Applicable To
    • Nephropathy NOS
    • Renal disease (acute) NOS
    • Renal insufficiency (acute)
    Type 1 Excludes
    • chronic renal insufficiency (N18.9)
    • unspecified nephritic syndrome (N05.-)
    N28.9
    )
  • uremia of newborn (
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code P96.0

    Congenital renal failure

      2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Billable/Specific Code Code on Newborn Record
    Applicable To
    • Uremia of newborn
    P96.0
    )
Clinical Information
  • A clinical syndrome associated with the retention of renal waste products or uremic toxins in the blood. It is usually the result of renal insufficiency. Most uremic toxins are end products of protein or nitrogen catabolism, such as urea or creatinine. Severe uremia can lead to multiple organ dysfunctions with a constellation of symptoms.
  • A condition in which the kidneys stop working and are not able to remove waste and extra water from the blood or keep body chemicals in balance. Acute or severe renal failure happens suddenly (for example, after an injury) and may be treated and cured. Chronic renal failure develops over many years, may be caused by conditions like high blood pressure or diabetes, and cannot be cured. Chronic renal failure may lead to total and long-lasting renal failure, called end-stage renal disease (esrd). A person in esrd needs dialysis (the process of cleaning the blood by passing it through a membrane or filter) or a kidney transplant.
  • A severe irreversible decline in the ability of kidneys to remove wastes, concentrate urine, and maintain electrolyte balance; blood pressure; and calcium metabolism.
  • Acute or chronic condition, characterized by the inability of the kidneys to adequately filter the blood substances, resulting in uremia and electrolyte imbalances. Acute renal failure is usually associated with oliguria or anuria, hyperkalemia, and pulmonary edema. Chronic renal failure is irreversible and requires hemodialysis.
  • Excess in the blood of urea, creatinine and other nitrogenous end products of protein and aminoacid metabolism; also, the constellation of signs and symptoms of chronic renal failure.
  • Healthy kidneys clean your blood by removing excess fluid, minerals and wastes. They also make hormones that keep your bones strong and your blood healthy. But if the kidneys are damaged, they don't work properly. Harmful wastes can build up in your body. Your blood pressure may rise. Your body may retain excess fluid and not make enough red blood cells. This is called kidney failure.if your kidneys fail, you need treatment to replace the work they normally do. The treatment options are dialysis or a kidney transplant. Each treatment has benefits and drawbacks. No matter which treatment you choose, you'll need to make some changes in your life, including how you eat and plan your activities. But with the help of healthcare providers, family and friends, most people with kidney failure can lead full and active lives.
  • Inability of a kidney to excrete metabolites at normal plasma levels under conditions of normal loading or inability to retain electrolytes under conditions of normal intake.
Codes
  • N19 Unspecified kidney failure