Unspecified jaundice R17- >

Type 1 Excludes
Type 1 Excludes Help
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes. It means "not coded here". A type 1 excludes note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as R17. A type 1 excludes note is for used for when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • neonatal jaundice (
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code P55

    Hemolytic disease of newborn

      2016 2017 2018 2019 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code
    P55
    ,
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code P57

    Kernicterus

      2016 2017 2018 2019 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code
    P57
    -
    ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code P59

    Neonatal jaundice from other and unspecified causes

      2016 2017 2018 2019 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code
    Type 1 Excludes
    • jaundice due to inborn errors of metabolism (E70-E88)
    • kernicterus (P57.-)
    P59
    )
Clinical Information
  • (jawn-dis) a condition in which the skin and the whites of the eyes become yellow, urine darkens, and the color of stool becomes lighter than normal. Jaundice occurs when the liver is not working properly or when a bile duct is blocked.
  • A clinical manifestation of hyperbilirubinemia, characterized by the yellowish staining of the skin; mucous membrane; and sclera. Clinical jaundice usually is a sign of liver dysfunction.
  • A condition in which the skin and the whites of the eyes become yellow, urine darkens, and the color of stool becomes lighter than normal. Jaundice occurs when the liver is not working properly or when a bile duct is blocked.
  • Clinical manifestation of hyperbilirubinemia, consisting of deposition of bile pigments in the skin, resulting in a yellowish staining of the skin and mucous membranes.
  • Jaundice causes your skin and the whites of your eyes to turn yellow. Too much bilirubin causes jaundice. Bilirubin is a yellow chemical in hemoglobin, the substance that carries oxygen in your red blood cells. As red blood cells break down, your body builds new cells to replace them. The old ones are processed by the liver. If the liver cannot handle the blood cells as they break down, bilirubin builds up in the body and your skin may look yellow. Many healthy babies have some jaundice during the first week of life. It usually goes away. However, jaundice can happen at any age and may be a sign of a problem. Jaundice can happen for many reasons, such as:
    • blood diseases
    • genetic syndromes
    • liver diseases, such as hepatitis or cirrhosis
    • blockage of bile ducts
    • infections
    • medicines
  • Skin yellowing due to excessive bilirubin in body
  • Yellow pigmentation of the skin, mucous membranes, and the eyes due to hyperbilirubinemia. Causes include liver disease, biliary tract obstruction, and hemolysis.
Codes
  • R17 Unspecified jaundice